EBOOK

Anthropology


€ 74,49
 
gebunden
Lieferbar innert 2 Wochen
Februar 2012

Beschreibung

Beschreibung

A unique alternative to more traditional, encyclopedic introductory texts, this book takes a question-oriented approach that illuminates major concepts for students. Structuring each chapter around an important question, the authors explore what it means to be human, incorporating answers from all four major subfields of anthropology-cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and archaeology. They address central issues of the discipline, highlighting the controversies and commitments that are shaping contemporary anthropology.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

BRIEF CONTENTS ; LIST OF BOXES ; PREFACE ; CHAPTER 1: WHAT IS ANTHROPOLOGY? ; MODULE 1: ANTHROPOLOGY, SCIENCE, AND STORYTELLING ; CHAPTER 2: WHY IS EVOLUTION IMPORTANT TO ANTHROPOLOGISTS? ; CHAPTER 3: WHAT CAN EVOLUTIONARY THEORY TELL US ABOUT HUMAN VARIATION? ; MODULE 2: DATING METHODS IN PALEOANTHROPOLOGY AND ARCHAEOLOGY ; CHAPTER 4: WHAT CAN THE STUDY OF PRIMATES TELL US ABOUT HUMAN BEINGS? ; CHAPTER 5: WHAT CAN THE FOSSIL RECORD TELL US ABOUT HUMAN ORIGINS? ; CHAPTER 6: HOW DO WE KNOW ABOUT THE HUMAN PAST? ; CHAPTER 7: WHY DID HUMANS SETTLE DOWN, BUILD CITIES, AND ESTABLISH STATES? ; CHAPTER 8: WHY IS THE CONCEPT OF CULTURE IMPORTANT? ; MODULE 3: ON ETHNOGRAPHIC METHODS ; CHAPTER 9: WHY IS UNDERSTANDING HUMAN LANGUAGE IMPORTANT? ; MODULE 4: COMPONENTS OF LANGUAGE ; CHAPTER 10: HOW DO WE MAKE MEANING? ; CHAPTER 11: WHY DO ANTHROPOLOGISTS STUDY ECONOMIC RELATIONS? ; CHAPTER 12: HOW DO ANTHROPOLOGISTS STUDY POLITICAL RELATIONS? ; CHAPTER 13: WHERE DO OUR RELATIVES COME FROM, AND WHY DO THEY MATTER? ; CHAPTER 14: WHAT CAN ANTHROPOLOGY TELL US ABOUT SOCIAL INEQUALITY? ; CHAPTER 15: WHAT CAN ANTHROPOLOGY TELL US ABOUT GLOBALIZATION? ; BIBLIOGRAPHY ; CREDITS ; GLOSSARY AND INDEX ; DETAILED CONTENTS ; LIST OF BOXES ; PREFACE ; CHAPTER 1 WHAT IS ANTHROPOLOGY? ; WHAT IS ANTHROPOLOGY? ; WHAT IS THE CONCEPT OF CULTURE? ; WHAT MAKES ANTHROPOLOGY A CROSS-DISCIPLINARY DISCIPLINE? ; BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY ; IN THEIR OWN WORDS: ANTHROPOLOGY AS A VOCATION LISTENING TO VOICES ; CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY ; LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY ; ARCHAEOLOGY ; APPLIED ANTHROPOLOGY ; MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY ; THE USES OF ANTHROPOLOGY ; CHAPTER SUMMARY ; FOR REVIEW AND DISCUSSION ; KEY TERMS ; SUGGESTED READINGS ; MODULE 1: ANTHROPOLOGY, SCIENCE, AND STORYTELLING ; SCIENTIFIC AND NONSCIENTIFIC EXPLANATIONS ; SOME KEY SCIENTIFIC CONCEPTS ; MODULE SUMMARY ; FOR REVIEW AND DISCUSSION ; KEY TERMS ; CHAPTER 2: WHY IS EVOLUTION IMPORTANT TO ANTHROPOLOGISTS? ; WHAT IS EVOLUTIONARY THEORY? ; WHAT MATERIAL EVIDENCE IS THERE FOR EVOLUTION? ; PRE-DARWINIAN VIEWS OF THE NATURAL WORLD ; ESSENTIALISM ; THE GREAT CHAIN OF BEING ; CATASTROPHISM AND UNIFORMITARIANISM ; TRANSFORMATIONAL EVOLUTION ; WHAT IS NATURAL SELECTION? ; POPULATION THINKING ; NATURAL SELECTION IN ACTION ; UNLOCKING THE SECRETS OF HEREDITY ; MENDEL'S EXPERIMENTS ; THE EMERGENCE OF GENETICS ; WHAT ARE THE BASICS OF CONTEMPORARY GENETICS? ; GENES AND TRAITS ; MUTATION ; DNA AND THE GENOME ; ANTHROPOLOGY IN EVERYDAY LIFE: FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY AND HUMAN RIGHTS ; GENOTYPE, PHENOTYPE, AND THE NORM OF REACTION ; IN THEIR OWN WORDS: HOW LIVING ORGANISMS CONSTRUCT THEIR ENVIRONMENTS ; WHAT DOES EVOLUTION MEAN? ; CHAPTER SUMMARY ; FOR REVIEW AND DISCUSSION ; KEY TERMS ; SUGGESTED READINGS ; CHAPTER 3: WHAT CAN EVOLUTIONARY THEORY TELL US ABOUT HUMAN VARIATION? ; WHAT IS MICROEVOLUTION? ; THE MODERN EVOLUTIONARY SYNTHESIS AND ITS LEGACY ; THE MOLECULARIZATION OF RACE? ; THE FOUR EVOLUTIONARY PROCESSES ; MICROEVOLUTION AND PATTERNS OF HUMAN VARIATION ; ADAPTATION AND HUMAN VARIATION ; PHENOTYPE, ENVIRONMENT AND CULTURE ; IN THEIR OWN WORDS: DNA TESTS FIND BRANCHES BUT FEW ROOTS ; WHAT IS MACROEVOLUTION? ; CAN WE PREDICT THE FUTURE OF HUMAN EVOLUTION? ; CHAPTER SUMMARY ; FOR REVIEW AND DISCUSSION ; KEY TERMS ; SUGGESTED READINGS ; MODULE 2: DATING METHODS IN PALEOANTHROPOLOGY AND ARCHAEOLOGY ; RELATIVE DATING METHODS ; NUMERICAL DATING METHODS ; MODELING PREHISTORIC CLIMATES ; MODULE SUMMARY ; FOR REVIEW AND DISCUSSION ; KEY TERMS ; CHAPTER 4: WHAT CAN THE STUDY OF PRIMATES TELL US ABOUT HUMAN BEINGS? ; WHAT ARE PRIMATES? ; APPROACHES TO PRIMATE TAXONOMY ; THE LIVING PRIMATES ; STREPSIRHINES ; HAPLORHINES ; IN THEIR OWN WORDS: THE FUTURE OF PRIMATE DIVERSITY ; FLEXIBILITY AS THE HALLMARK OF PRIMATE ADAPTATIONS ; IN THEIR OWN WORDS: CHIMPANZEE TOURISM ; PAST EVOLUTIONARY TRENDS IN PRIMATES ; PRIMATE EVOLUTION: THE FIRST 60 MILLION YEARS ; PRIMATES OF THE PALEOCENE ; PRIMATES OF THE EOCENE ; PRIMATES OF THE OLIGOCENE ; PRIMATES OF THE MIOCENE ; CHAPTER SUMMARY ; FOR REVIEW AND DISCUSSION ; KEY TERMS ; SUGGESTED READINGS ; CHAPTER 5: WHAT CAN THE FOSSIL RECORD TELL US ABOUT HUMAN ORIGINS? ; HOMININ EVOLUTION ; WHO WERE THE FIRST HOMININS? (6-3 MYA) ; THE ORIGIN OF BIPEDALISM ; CHANGES IN HOMININ DENTITION ; IN THEIR OWN WORDS: FINDING FOSSILS ; WHO WERE THE LATER AUSTRALOPITH? (3-1.5 MYA) ; HOW MANY SPECIES OF AUSTRALOPITH WERE THERE? ; HOW CAN ANTHROPOLOGISTS EXPLAIN THE HUMAN TRANSITION? ; WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT EARLY HOMO? (2.4-1.5 MYA) ; EXPANSION OF THE AUSTRALOPITH BRAIN ; HOW MANY SPECIES OF EARLY HOMO WERE THERE? ; EARLIEST EVIDENCE OF CULTURE: STONE TOOLS OF THE OLDOWAN TRADITION ; WHO WAS HOMO ERECTUS? (1.8-1.7 MYA TO 0.5-0.4 MYA) ; MORPHOLOGICAL TRAITS OF H. ERECTUS ; THE CULTURE OF H. ERECTUS ; H. ERECTUS THE HUNTER ; THE EVOLUTIONARY FATE OF H. ERECTUS ; HOW DID HOMO SAPIENS EVOLVE? ; FOSSIL EVIDENCE FOR THE TRANSITION TO MODERN H. SAPIENS ; WHERE DID MODERN H. SAPIENS COME FROM? ; WHO WERE THE NEANDERTALS? (130,000 TO 35,000 YEARS AGO) ; MIDDLE PALEOLITHIC/MIDDLE STONE AGE CULTURE ; DID NEANDERTALS HUNT? ; IN THEIR OWN WORDS: BAD HAIR DAYS IN THE PALEOLITHIC MODERN (RE)CONSTRUCTIONS OF THE CAVE MAN ; WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT ANATOMICALLY MODERN HUMANS? (200,000 YEARS AGO TO PRESENT) ; WHAT CAN GENETICS TELL US ABOUT MODERN HUMAN ORIGINS? ; THE UPPER PALEOLITHIC/LATE STONE AGE (40,000? TO 12,000 YEARS AGO) ; WHAT HAPPENED TO THE NEANDERTALS? ; UPPER PALEOLITHIC/LATE STONE AGE CULTURES ; IN THEIR OWN WORDS: WOMEN'S ART IN THE UPPER PALEOLITHIC ; SPREAD OF MODERN H. SAPIENS IN LATE PLEISTOCENE TIMES ; EASTERN ASIA AND SIBERIA ; THE AMERICAS ; AUSTRALASIA ; TWO MILLION YEARS OF HUMAN EVOLUTION ; CHAPTER SUMMARY ; FOR REVIEW AND DISCUSSION ; KEY TERMS ; SUGGESTED READINGS ; CHAPTER 6: HOW DO WE KNOW ABOUT THE HUMAN PAST? ; ARCHAEOLOGY ; SURVEYS ; ARCHAEOLOGICAL EXCAVATION ; INTERPRETING THE PAST ; SUBSISTENCE STRATEGIES ; BANDS, TRIBES, CHIEFDOMS, AND STATES ; WHOSE PAST IS IT? ; PLUNDERING THE PAST ; CONTEMPORARY TRENDS IN ARCHAEOLOGY ; GENDER ARCHAEOLOGY ; COLLABORATIVE APPROACHES TO STUDYING THE PAST ; COSMOPOLITAN ARCHAEOLOGIES ; ANTHROPOLOGY IN EVERYDAY LIFE: ARCHAEOLOGY AS A TOOL OF CIVIC ENGAGEMENT ; CHAPTER SUMMARY ; FOR REVIEW AND DISCUSSION ; KEY TERMS ; SUGGESTED READINGS ; CHAPTER 7: WHY DID HUMANS SETTLE DOWN, BUILD CITIES, AND ESTABLISH STATES? ; HUMAN IMAGINATION AND THE MATERIAL WORLD ; IS PLANT CULTIVATION A FORM OF NICHE CONSTRUCTION? ; ANIMAL DOMESTICATION ; WAS THERE ONLY ONE MOTOR OF DOMESTICATION? ; HOW DID DOMESTICATION, CULTIVATION, AND SEDENTISM BEGIN IN SOUTHWEST ASIA? ; NATUFIAN SOCIAL ORGANIZATION ; NATUFIAN SUBSISTENCE ; DOMESTICATION ELSEWHERE IN THE WORLD ; WHAT WERE THE CONSEQUENCES OF DOMESTICATION AND SEDENTISM? ; IN THEIR OWN WORDS: THE FOOD REVOLUTION ; WHAT IS SOCIAL COMPLEXITY? ; HOW CAN ANTHROPOLOGISTS EXPLAIN THE RISE OF COMPLEX SOCIETIES? ; WHAT IS THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL EVIDENCE FOR SOCIAL COMPLEXITY? ; WHY DID STRATIFICATION BEGIN? ; HOW CAN ANTHROPOLOGISTS EXPLAIN THE RISE OF COMPLEX SOCIETIES? ; ANDEAN CIVILIZATION ; IN THEIR OWN WORDS: THE ECOLOGICAL CONSEQUENCES OF SOCIAL COMPLEXITY ; CHAPTER SUMMARY ; FOR REVIEW AND DISCUSSION ; KEY TERMS ; SUGGESTED READINGS ; CHAPTER 8: WHY IS THE CONCEPT OF CULTURE IMPORTANT? ; HOW DO ANTHROPOLOGISTS DEFINE CULTURE? ; IN THEIR OWN WORDS: THE PARADOX OF ETHNOCENTRISM ; IN THEIR OWN WORDS: CULTURE AND FREEDOM ; CULTURE, HISTORY AND HUMAN AGENCY ; IN THEIR OWN WORDS: HUMAN-RIGHTS LAW AND THE DEMONIZATION OF CULTURE ; WHY DO CULTURAL DIFFERENCES MATTER? ; WHAT IS ETHNOCENTRISM? ; IS IT POSSIBLE TO AVOID ETHNOCENTRIC BIAS? ; WHAT IS CULTURAL RELATIVISM? ; HOW CAN CULTURAL RELATIVITY IMPROVE OUR UNDERSTANDING OF CONTROVERSIAL CULTURAL PRACTICES? ; GENITAL CUTTING, GENDER, AND HUMAN RIGHTS ; GENITAL CUTTING AS A VALUED RITUAL ; CULTURE AND MORAL REASONING ; DID THEIR CULTURE MAKE THEM DO IT? ; DOES CULTURE EXPLAIN EVERYTHING? ; CULTURE CHANGE AND CULTURAL AUTHENTICITY ; THE PROMISE OF THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE ; CHAPTER SUMMARY ; FOR REVIEW AND DISCUSSION ; KEY TERMS ; SUGGESTED READINGS ; MODULE 3: ON ETHNOGR...

Portrait

Robert H. Lavenda is Professor of Anthropology and Co-chair of the Department of Anthropology at St. Cloud State University. Emily A. Schultz is Professor of Anthropology at St. Cloud State University.

Pressestimmen

"I truly love this book. It treats all of the essential elements of an overview course in a sophisticated style with an abundance of maps and photographs."
-Rosalyn Howard, University of Central Florida
"More than any I have used, this text parallels the way in which I structure my introductory course. It is easy to read, has excellent chapter summaries, and the color photographs and drawings are much more engaging than those in other texts that I've used."
-Charles Riggs, Fort Lewis College
"This is the only anthropology text I have encountered that provides just about the right amount of fact, theory, and examples."
-Mary Theresa Bonhage-Freund, Alma College
EAN: 9780195392876
ISBN: 0195392876
Untertitel: What Does It Mean to Be Human?. 2 Rev ed. Illustrations (chiefly col. ), col. maps. Sprache: Englisch.
Verlag: Oxford University Press Inc
Erscheinungsdatum: Februar 2012
Seitenanzahl: 528 Seiten
Format: gebunden
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