EBOOK

Technical Communication for Readers and Writers

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September 2002

Beschreibung

Beschreibung

Sims' Technical Communication for Readers and Writers, Second Edition, guides students in planning, writing, and designing effective documents to meet the needs of users and readers. Thoroughly revised, expanded, and redesigned in full color, this edition gives students the tools they need to create appropriate technical documents for a multitude of writing situations and audiences. The text takes a process approach rather than the model-based approach of older tech writing texts.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

1. Writing, the Workplace, and This Book How Will Writing Impact Your Career? How Does the Workplace Affect What and How You Write? The Reader's Corner: Are You Ready to Be an Information Broker? What Makes Technical Communication Effective? Taking It into the Workplace: Visiting with a Professional in Your Field What's Ahead in This Book? I. Understanding the Role of the Writer 2. Understanding and Writing for Your Readers Principle 1: Determine Your Purpose for Writing Principle 2: Identify Your Readers Taking It into the Workplace: Readers and the Web Principle 3: Determine Your Readers' Purpose, Needs, and Preferences Principle 4: Analyze Your Readers' Attitudes The Reader's Corner: How We Read Conclusion Worksheet for Identifying Your Readers Exercises Case Study: Informing Students About Financial Aid 3. Facing Ethical and Legal Challenges Understanding Ethics Making Ethical Decisions The Reader's Corner: "Uh, Where Are We?" Principle 1: Ask the Right Questions Taking It into the Workplace: Your Profession and Its Code of Conduct Principle 2: Work Through Ethical Decisions Principle 3: Communicate Ethically Turning to the Law When Faced with an Ethical Dilemma Conclusion Worksheet for Ethical Communication Exercises Case Study: A Broken Promise 4. Collaborating and the Writing Process Collaborative Writing in the Workplace Principle 1: Collaborate to Analyze the Writing Situation and Plan the Document Taking It into the Workplace: Collaborating Across Generations Principle 2: Use Electronic Media to Collaborate Principle 3: Collaborate Effectively The Reader's Corner: Conducting a Successful Teleconference Conclusion Worksheet for Successful Collaboration Exercises Case Study: A Public Relations Problem at Big Lake II. Knowing the Tools of the Writer 5. Researching Information Using Primary and Secondary Sources Principle 1: Plan Your Research Principle 2: Select Appropriate Primary Research Techniques Principle 3: Select Appropriate Secondary Research Strategies Taking It into the Workplace: Copyright Laws and "Fair Use" Principle 4: Evaluate the Information and Sources The Reader's Corner: The Disadvantages of Web Research Conclusion Worksheet for Researching Information Using Primary and Secondary Sources Exercises Case Study: Discovering Job Prospects in Your Field 6. Organizing Information for Your Readers Readers and Your Documents Principle 1: Decide How to Organize Your Document Principle 2: Consider Using the Standard Patters of Organization Principle 3: Prepare an Outline The Reader's Corner: Organizing Web Sites Taking It into the Workplace: Organization Makes a Difference Principle 4: Tell Readers What You Are Writing About Principle 5: Use Headings to Show the Organization of Your Document Conclusion Worksheet for Organizing Your Documents Exercises Case Study: Writing Overviews and Headings 7. Writing Reader-Oriented Sentences and Paragraphs Focus on Actors and Actions Principle 1: Make the Actors the Subjects of Your Sentences The Reader's Corner: Reader-Oriented Poetry Principle 2: Put the Action in Verbs Principle 3: Emphasize the Important Information in Your Sentences Principle 4: Tie Your Sentences Together Taking It into the Workplace: How Are Your Editing Skills? Conclusion Worksheet for Writing Reader-Oriented Sentences and Paragraphs Exercises 8. Using Reader-Oriented Language Principle 1: Use Specific and Unambiguous Language The Reader's Corner: Localizing Documents for International Readers Principle 2: Use Only the Words Your Readers Need Principle 3: Use Simple Words Principle 4: Use Positive Language Principle 5: Use Technical Terminology Consistently and Appropriately Principle 6: Use Nonsexist Language Principle 7: Consider Your Readers' Culture and Language Taking It into the Workplace: What Is Simplified English? Conclusion Worksheet for Using Reader-Oriented Language Exercises Case Study: Changing Old Habits 9. Designing Documents for Your Readers How Design Makes Documents More Readable Principle 1: Consider the Design as You Plan Your Documents Principle 2: Choose Design Elements to Motivate Readers to Read Principle 3: Choose Design Elements to Help Readers Locate Information Taking It into the Workplace: Using Color to Structure Information Principle 4: Choose Design Elements to Help Readers Read Your Documents The Reader's Corner: Typography Conclusion Worksheet for Designing Documents for Your Readers Exercises Case Study: A "Diastrous" Design 10. Creating Effective Visual Aids for Your Readers Principle 1: Look for Areas Where Visual Aids Will Help You Communicate Principle 2: Design Visual Aids That Are Clear Taking It into the Workplace: The International Language of Graphics Principle 3: Select the Appropriate Visual Aid The Reader's Corner: Visual Aids in Space Principle 4: Integrate Visual Aids into the Text Principle 5: Use Computer Software to Create Professional-Looking Visual Aids Conclusion: Ethics and Visual Aids Worksheet for Creating Effective Visual Aids for Your Readers Exercises 11. Preparing Front and Back Matter Principle 1: Prepare the Front Matter The Reader's Corner: The First "Covers" Principle 2: Prepare the Back Matter Principle 3: Number the Pages Conclusion Taking It into the Workplace: Moving Front and Back Matter into the World of Online Communication Worksheet for Preparing Front and Back Matter Exercises III. Producing Effective Documents and Presentations for Your Audience 12. Writing Reader-Oriented Proposals Principle 1: Find Out About the Readers of Your Proposals Principle 2: Prepare to Answer Readers' Questions Principle 3: Use the Conventional Elements of Proposals The Reader's Corner: Presidential Proposals Taking It into the Workplace: The Future of Proposals Two Sample Proposals Worksheet for Writing Reader-Oriented Proposals Exercises Case Study: Working for the Community 13. Writing Reader-Oriented Informal Reports Principle 1: Find Out About the Readers Principle 2: Prepare to Answer Readers' Questions Principle 3: Determine the Appropriate Format and Conventional Elements for the Report Writing Progress Reports Taking It into the Workplace: Progress Reports and Telecommuting Writing Meeting Minutes The Reader's Corner: Dramatizing Progress Reports Writing Field and Lab Reports Writing Trip Reports Sample Informal Reports Worksheet for Writing Reader-Oriented Informal Reports Exercises Case Study: Relocating an Office 14. Writing Reader-Oriented Formal Reports The Types of Formal Reports The Reader's Corner: Reports and the Free Press Principle 1: Identify the Readers and the Purpose of Your Reports Principle 2: Formulate Questions and Research When Needed Principle 3: Make Conclusions and Recommendations Based on Sound Research Principle 4: Use the Conventional Elements When Writing Your Reports Taking It into the Workplace: Personal Computers, the Web, and Corporate Information Writing Feasibility Reports Two Sample Reports Worksheet for Writing Reader-Oriented Formal Reports Exercises Case Study: Deciding Where to Live in the Fall 15. Writing User-Oriented Instructions and Manuals Principle 1: Find Out How Much the Readers Know About the Task Principle 2: Use an Accessible Design Taking It into the Workplace: A Note About Paper Versus Online Instructions The Reader's Corner: Liability and Instructional Writing: Can You or Your Company Be Liable? Principle 3: Use User-Oriented Language Principle 4: Test Your Instructions Principle 5: Use the Appropriate Conventional Elements of Instructions and Manuals Sample Instructions Worksheet for Writing User-Oriented Instructions and Manuals Exercises Case Study: Collaborating on a Manual 16. Creating User-Oriented Web Sites An Overview of the Process of Developing Web Sites Principle 1: Identify the Users and the Purpose of the Site Principle 2: Identify the Types of Content for the Site The Reader's Corner: Copyright, Intellectual Property, and the Web Principle 3: Determine the Overall Organization of the Site Principle 4: Design User-Oriented Pages Taking It into the Workplace: Making Your Web Site Credible Principle 5: Create User-Oriented Content Principle 6: Help Users to Navigate the Site Principle 7: Test and Revise the Site Principle 8: Edit, Proofread, and Maintain the Site Sample Web Pages Worksheet for Creating User-Oriented Web Sites Exercises Case Study: Helping a Non-Profit Organization in Your Community 17. Creating and Delivering Oral Presentations Understanding the Types of Oral Presentations Principle 1: Plan for the Audience and the Occasion Principle 2: Plan Your Presentation Principle 3: Use Audience-Oriented Visual Aids The Reader's Corner: Overcoming Those Nervous Jitters Principle 4: Use Effective Strategies for Delivering the Presentation Taking It into the Workplace: Taking Your Cues from the Audience Conclusion Worksheet for Creating and Delivering Oral Presentations Exercises Case Study: Working with a Team to Prepare an Oral Presentation IV. Using the Writer's Tools to Correspond with Your Readers 18. Writing Reader-Oriented Letters, Memos, and Email Principle 1: Determine the Objectives of Your Letter, Memo, or E-Mail Principle 2: Find Out About Your Readers and How They Will Perceive Your Message Principle 3: Use a Reader-Oriented Tone Principle 4: Determine the Most Effective Approach for Your Readers Principle 5: Use an Appropriate Format The Reader's Corner: Early Snail Mail Taking It into the Workplace: E-Mail and Netiquette Conclusion Worksheet for Writing Reader-Oriented Letters, Memos, and E-Mail Exercises Case Study: A "Mixed-Up" Situation 19. Writing Reader-Oriented Job Correspondence Principle 1: Consider Various Methods for Locating Job Opportunities Principle 2: Determine What Information You Want Employers to Know About You Principle 3: Prepare an Effective Resume The Reader's Corner: Ethically Challenged Resumes Taking It into the Workplace: The Electronic Job Search Principle 4: Write a Reader-Oriented Letter of Application Principle 5: Use Letters to Follow Up Conclusion Worksheet for Writing Reader-Oriented Job Correspondence Exercises Appendixes Appendix A: Documenting Your Sources APA Style MLA Style Appendix B: Review of Common Sentence Errors, Punctuation, and Mechanics Common Sentence Errors Punctuation Mechanics Works Cited Index

Pressestimmen

1. Writing, the Workplace, and This Book How Will Writing Impact Your Career? How Does the Workplace Affect What and How You Write? The Reader's Corner: Are You Ready to Be an Information Broker? What Makes Technical Communication Effective? Taking It into the Workplace: Visiting with a Professional in Your Field What's Ahead in This Book? I. Understanding the Role of the Writer 2. Understanding and Writing for Your Readers Principle 1: Determine Your Purpose for Writing Principle 2: Identify Your Readers Taking It into the Workplace: Readers and the Web Principle 3: Determine Your Readers' Purpose, Needs, and Preferences Principle 4: Analyze Your Readers' Attitudes The Reader's Corner: How We Read Conclusion Worksheet for Identifying Your Readers Exercises Case Study: Informing Students About Financial Aid 3. Facing Ethical and Legal Challenges Understanding Ethics Making Ethical Decisions The Reader's Corner: "Uh, Where Are We?" Principle 1: Ask the Right Questions Taking It into the Workplace: Your Profession and Its Code of Conduct Principle 2: Work Through Ethical Decisions Principle 3: Communicate Ethically Turning to the Law When Faced with an Ethical Dilemma Conclusion Worksheet for Ethical Communication Exercises Case Study: A Broken Promise 4. Collaborating and the Writing Process Collaborative Writing in the Workplace Principle 1: Collaborate to Analyze the Writing Situation and Plan the Document Taking It into the Workplace: Collaborating Across Generations Principle 2: Use Electronic Media to Collaborate Principle 3: Collaborate Effectively The Reader's Corner: Conducting a Successful Teleconference Conclusion Worksheet for Successful Collaboration Exercises Case Study: A Public Relations Problem at Big Lake II. Knowing the Tools of the Writer 5. Researching Information Using Primary and Secondary Sources Principle 1: Plan Your Research Principle 2: Select Appropriate Primary Research Techniques Principle 3: Select Appropriate Secondary Research Strategies Taking It into the Workplace: Copyright Laws and "Fair Use" Principle 4: Evaluate the Information and Sources The Reader's Corner: The Disadvantages of Web Research Conclusion Worksheet for Researching Information Using Primary and Secondary Sources Exercises Case Study: Discovering Job Prospects in Your Field 6. Organizing Information for Your Readers Readers and Your Documents Principle 1: Decide How to Organize Your Document Principle 2: Consider Using the Standard Patters of Organization Principle 3: Prepare an Outline The Reader's Corner: Organizing Web Sites Taking It into the Workplace: Organization Makes a Difference Principle 4: Tell Readers What You Are Writing About Principle 5: Use Headings to Show the Organization of Your Document Conclusion Worksheet for Organizing Your Documents Exercises Case Study: Writing Overviews and Headings 7. Writing Reader-Oriented Sentences and Paragraphs Focus on Actors and Actions Principle 1: Make the Actors the Subjects of Your Sentences The Reader's Corner: Reader-Oriented Poetry Principle 2: Put the Action in Verbs Principle 3: Emphasize the Important Information in Your Sentences Principle 4: Tie Your Sentences Together Taking It into the Workplace: How Are Your Editing Skills? Conclusion Worksheet for Writing Reader-Oriented Sentences and Paragraphs Exercises 8. Using Reader-Oriented Language Principle 1: Use Specific and Unambiguous Language The Reader's Corner: Localizing Documents for International Readers Principle 2: Use Only the Words Your Readers Need Principle 3: Use Simple Words Principle 4: Use Positive Language Principle 5: Use Technical Terminology Consistently and Appropriately Principle 6: Use Nonsexist Language Principle 7: Consider Your Readers' Culture and Language Taking It into the Workplace: What Is Simplified English? Conclusion Worksheet for Using Reader-Oriented Language Exercises Case Study: Changing Old Habits 9. Designing Documents for Your Readers How Design Makes Documents More Readable Principle 1: Consider the Design as You Plan Your Documents Principle 2: Choose Design Elements to Motivate Readers to Read Principle 3: Choose Design Elements to Help Readers Locate Information Taking It into the Workplace: Using Color to Structure Information Principle 4: Choose Design Elements to Help Readers Read Your Documents The Reader's Corner: Typography Conclusion Worksheet for Designing Documents for Your Readers Exercises Case Study: A "Diastrous" Design 10. Creating Effective Visual Aids for Your Readers Principle 1: Look for Areas Where Visual Aids Will Help You Communicate Principle 2: Design Visual Aids That Are Clear Taking It into the Workplace: The International Language of Graphics Principle 3: Select the Appropriate Visual Aid The Reader's Corner: Visual Aids in Space Principle 4: Integrate Visual Aids into the Text Principle 5: Use Computer Software to Create Professional-Looking Visual Aids Conclusion: Ethics and Visual Aids Worksheet for Creating Effective Visual Aids for Your Readers Exercises 11. Preparing Front and Back Matter Principle 1: Prepare the Front Matter The Reader's Corner: The First "Covers" Principle 2: Prepare the Back Matter Principle 3: Number the Pages Conclusion Taking It into the Workplace: Moving Front and Back Matter into the World of Online Communication Worksheet for Preparing Front and Back Matter Exercises III. Producing Effective Documents and Presentations for Your Audience 12. Writing Reader-Oriented Proposals Principle 1: Find Out About the Readers of Your Proposals Principle 2: Prepare to Answer Readers' Questions Principle 3: Use the Conventional Elements of Proposals The Reader's Corner: Presidential Proposals Taking It into the Workplace: The Future of Proposals Two Sample Proposals Worksheet for Writing Reader-Oriented Proposals Exercises Case Study: Working for the Community 13. Writing Reader-Oriented Informal Reports Principle 1: Find Out About the Readers Principle 2: Prepare to Answer Readers' Questions Principle 3: Determine the Appropriate Format and Conventional Elements for the Report Writing Progress Reports Taking It into the Workplace: Progress Reports and Telecommuting Writing Meeting Minutes The Reader's Corner: Dramatizing Progress Reports Writing Field and Lab Reports Writing Trip Reports Sample Informal Reports Worksheet for Writing Reader-Oriented Informal Reports Exercises Case Study: Relocating an Office 14. Writing Reader-Oriented Formal Reports The Types of Formal Reports The Reader's Corner: Reports and the Free Press Principle 1: Identify the Readers and the Purpose of Your Reports Principle 2: Formulate Questions and Research When Needed Principle 3: Make Conclusions and Recommendations Based on Sound Research Principle 4: Use the Conventional Elements When Writing Your Reports Taking It into the Workplace: Personal Computers, the Web, and Corporate Information Writing Feasibility Reports Two Sample Reports Worksheet for Writing Reader-Oriented Formal Reports Exercises Case Study: Deciding Where to Live in the Fall 15. Writing User-Oriented Instructions and Manuals Principle 1: Find Out How Much the Readers Know About the Task Principle 2: Use an Accessible Design Taking It into the Workplace: A Note About Paper Versus Online Instructions The Reader's Corner: Liability and Instructional Writing: Can You or Your Company Be Liable? Principle 3: Use User-Oriented Language Principle 4: Test Your Instructions Principle 5: Use the Appropriate Conventional Elements of Instructions and Manuals Sample Instructions Worksheet for Writing User-Oriented Instructions and Manuals Exercises Case Study: Collaborating on a Manual 16. Creating User-Oriented Web Sites An Overview of the Process of Developing Web Sites Principle 1: Identify the Users and the Purpose of the Site Principle 2: Identify the Types of Content for the Site The Reader's Corner: Copyright, Intellectual Property, and the Web Principle 3: Determine the Overall Organization of the Site Principle 4: Design User-Oriented Pages Taking It into the Workplace: Making Your Web Site Credible Principle 5: Create User-Oriented Content Principle 6: Help Users to Navigate the Site Principle 7: Test and Revise the Site Principle 8: Edit, Proofread, and Maintain the Site Sample Web Pages Worksheet for Creating User-Oriented Web Sites Exercises Case Study: Helping a Non-Profit Organization in Your Community 17. Creating and Delivering Oral Presentations Understanding the Types of Oral Presentations Principle 1: Plan for the Audience and the Occasion Principle 2: Plan Your Presentation Principle 3: Use Audience-Oriented Visual Aids The Reader's Corner: Overcoming Those Nervous Jitters Principle 4: Use Effective Strategies for Delivering the Presentation Taking It into the Workplace: Taking Your Cues from the Audience Conclusion Worksheet for Creating and Delivering Oral Presentations Exercises Case Study: Working with a Team to Prepare an Oral Presentation IV. Using the Writer's Tools to Correspond with Your Readers 18. Writing Reader-Oriented Letters, Memos, and Email Principle 1: Determine the Objectives of Your Letter, Memo, or E-Mail Principle 2: Find Out About Your Readers and How They Will Perceive Your Message Principle 3: Use a Reader-Oriented Tone Principle 4: Determine the Most Effective Approach for Your Readers Principle 5: Use an Appropriate Format The Reader's Corner: Early Snail Mail Taking It into the Workplace: E-Mail and Netiquette Conclusion Worksheet for Writing Reader-Oriented Letters, Memos, and E-Mail Exercises Case Study: A "Mixed-Up" Situation 19. Writing Reader-Oriented Job Correspondence Principle 1: Consider Various Methods for Locating Job Opportunities Principle 2: Determine What Information You Want Employers to Know About You Principle 3: Prepare an Effective Resume The Reader's Corner: Ethically Challenged Resumes Taking It into the Workplace: The Electronic Job Search Principle 4: Write a Reader-Oriented Letter of Application Principle 5: Use Letters to Follow Up Conclusion Worksheet for Writing Reader-Oriented Job Correspondence Exercises Appendixes Appendix A: Documenting Your Sources APA Style MLA Style Appendix B: Review of Common Sentence Errors, Punctuation, and Mechanics Common Sentence Errors Punctuation Mechanics Works Cited Index
EAN: 9780618221738
ISBN: 0618221735
Untertitel: Sprache: Englisch.
Verlag: CENGAGE LEARNING
Erscheinungsdatum: September 2002
Seitenanzahl: 685 Seiten
Format: kartoniert
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