EBOOK

Rethinking God as Gift: Marion, Derrida, and the Limits of Phenomenology


€ 90,49
 
gebunden
Besorgung - Lieferbarkeit unbestimmt
Juli 2001

Beschreibung

Beschreibung

Rethinking God as Gift is situated at the intersection of philosophy, critical theory and theology. The first sustained study of the work of Jean-Luc Marion in English, it offers a unique perspective on contemporary questions and their theological relevance. Taking its point of departure from the problem of the gift as articulated by Jacques Derrida, who argues that the conditions of possibility of the gift are also its conditions of impossibility, Horner pursues a series of questions concerning the nature of thought, the viability of phenomenology, and, most urgently, the possibility of grace. For Marion, phenomenology, as the thought of the given, offers a path for philosophy to proceed without being implicated in metaphysics. His retrieval of several important insights of Edmund Husserl, along with his reading of Martin Heidegger and Emmanuel Levinas, enables him to work out a phenomenology where even "impossible" phenomena such as revelation and the gift might be examined. In this important confrontation between Marion and Derrida issues vital to the negotiation of postmodern concerns in philosophy and theology emerge with vigour. The careful elucidation of those issues in an interdisciplinary context, and the snapshot it provides of the state of contemporary debate, make Rethinking God as Gift an important contribution to theological and philosophical discussion.

Portrait

Robyn Horner is Professor of Religion and Theology at Monash University in Australia.

Pressestimmen

"At once rigorous, insightful, and accessible, Horner's book pushes phenomenology to its limits in order there to show how the phenomenological paradoxes of an unconditional gift might shed productive new light on the theological paradoxes of a self-giving God. Elucidating the essential background in Husserl, Heidegger, and Levinas, Horner goes on to offer the most thorough study yet available on the phenomenological treatment of God as gift in Marion and Derrida. Invaluable reading for those concerned with the theological promise of contemporary Continental philosophy, Rethinking God as Gift is sure to generate lively and productive debate." - Thomas A. Carlson, Associate Professor, Department of Religious Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara "This wonderfully ambitious book addresses one of the most daunting problems in recent philosophical thought, namely the notion of the gift. Not limiting herself to anthropological and philosophical analysis, Robyn Horner presses on into the radically theological considerations involved. However unsettling the questions raised here, theologians will be immensely grateful for this book. Even as theology is recalled to its primary task, its practitioners will be richly instructed by the brilliant criticism, the finely nuanced survey of the contemporary European context, and the remarkable range of philosophical and theological reference. Indeed, I feel sure this work will be acclaimed by scholars of many disciplines." - Tony Kelly, Australian Catholic University "Never before has anyone written so sharply and so judiciously about the debate between Jacques Derrida and Jean-Luc Marion over whether a gift is possible. Never has anyone written so incisively about Marion's analysis of givenness. It is only by passing through phenomenology, Horner argues, that we can develop a theology that makes rigorous sense of the call, forgiveness, grace, revelation and sacrifice. Rethinking God as Gift is a brilliant contribution to the 'theological turn' in phenomenology: a clarification of its ways, an extension of its concerns, and a recognition of its limits." - Kevin Hart, author of The Trespass of the Sign: Deconstruction, Theology, and Philosophy.
EAN: 9780823221219
ISBN: 0823221210
Untertitel: Sprache: Englisch.
Verlag: FORDHAM UNIV PR
Erscheinungsdatum: Juli 2001
Seitenanzahl: 272 Seiten
Format: gebunden
Es gibt zu diesem Artikel noch keine Bewertungen.Kundenbewertung schreiben