EBOOK

Emergence of the New Majority--Volume 1 of Social Capitalism in Theory and Practice


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März 2008

Beschreibung

Beschreibung

Describes the heterogeneous middle-middle majority, and how it comprises those who have climbed from proletarian origins, as well as those from the upper middle classes whose confidence and affluence have been broken on the wheel of egalitarian forces. This book analyses the hidden undercurrents of the left and Marxism.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

CONTENTS; INTRODUCTION; 1 - Divorce between government and the electorate; 2 - Bankruptcy of left/right politics; 3 - Failure of will to meet the prospects of catastrophe; 4 - The call of Social Capitalism and what it is; 5 - Testing the early theory in the field of politics; 6 - Principles of Social Capitalism; 7 - The Labour party resists socialising capitalism; 8 - Relations with the unions; 9 - Response to "New Socialism"; 10 - Corrosive resentment of socialism; 11 - Unrealism of Labour members; 12 - Social Capitalism and academia; 13 - Safeguarding national integrity; 14 - The priority of internationalism; 15 - Achieving Social Capitalism; PART I; Introduction to Part I:-; THE MISMATCH OF NEW SOCIETY WITH OLD IDEAS; CHAPTER 1; The Remit of Political Discussion; 1 - Need to identify the remit of political discussion; 2 - The; 8 spheres of political life; 3 - Characteristics of a political party; 4 - Characteristics of the local politician; 5 - Distinguishing the Agitator from the Politician; 6 - The change from Idealist to Functionary; 7 - Characteristics of the Ordinary party member; 8 - The Councillor and Ordinary member compared; 9 - The Trades Union activist; 10 - Future role of the unions; 11 - But this is threatened; 12 - The party as national government; 13 - The fusion and confusion between Action and Purpose; 14 - Limitations of governmental power; 15 - Need to re-formulate principles in strengthening party purpose; 16 - For whom do governments rule?; 17 - Dangers to democracy; 18 - Distinguishing the party electorate from the party membership; 19 - Is the Party betrayed by the government?; CHAPTER 2; Arousing a New Political Consciousness; 1 - Need to repudiate the tenets of the past; 2 - The transformation of society; 3 - The new 90 per cent majority is Social Capitalism's natural constituency; 4 - Economic changes demonstrating this; 5 - Confronting Neo-Liberalism; 6 - Arousing a consciousness for the Responsible Society; 7 - Function of the Party Manifesto; 8 - Underlying philosophy of the Party should unify its component parts; 9 - Party and not government should oversee principles; 10 - Old Socialism sought to undermine the Realpolitik of Labour government; 11 - The objectivity of New Socialism helps to justify practical necessity; 12 - Value of the historical approach to political understanding; 13 - Importance of empiricism; 14 - Need for sociological considerations; 15 - And lastly, the holistic approach. CHAPTER 3; Chameleons, Self-Deceivers and Intriguers; 1 - Confronting a chameleon; 2 - Business people must become agents for change; 3 - Damaging legacy of Old Socialist feeling; 4 - The dyspeptic local official; 5 - The success of his tactics; 6 - But he remains a respected establishment figure; 7 - Despite his hidden political views; 8 - Pretence and hypocrisy of many Party activists; 9 - Causes of this; 10 - An ideological vacuum makes the party vulnerable; 11 - The poison of those with secret agendas; CHAPTER 4; The Drive towards Internal Authority; 1 - Internal and External authority; 2 - Why society's leaders should support Social Capitalism; 3 - The multi-class society disdains class struggle; 4 - Class war no longer viable; 5 - Implications of attacking an economic system; 6 - Social Capitalists as promoters of business; 7 - As responsible stewards of the economy; 8 - Old Socialism was undemocratic; 9 - Collectivism and representative bodies are often undemocratic; 10 - Comparison with true democratic systems; 11 - People power defined; 12 - Origins and nature of state authority; 13 - Authority in the medieval world; 14 - Emergence of capitalism; 15 - Centralisation and the new absolutism and reactions against them; CHAPTER 5; Emergence of the Fully Conscious Community; 1 - Justifying the acquisitive instinct; 2 - Contrasting outcome of the American and French Revolutions; 3 - Emergence of the uncompromising struggle; 4 - But it entailed a de-humanising or regression of social consciousness; 5 - Emergence of the middle-middle majority; 6 - The popular demand for ownership and control differs from that of Old Socialism; 7 - Social benefits of the knowledge-based society; 8 - The strengthening of internal authority; 9 - Confronting the problem of bread and circuses; 10 - Whilst the American concept of freedom is based on Satisfaction the European concept is based on the Reality of human relations; 11 - But Behaviourist management techniques have taken over the Labour Party; 12 - Full consciousness in society and what it means; CHAPTER 6; Breakdown of The Old Class System; 1 - The benevolent state and the uncaring individual; 2 - Social Capitalism concerned with all aspects of society; 3 - The communally-minded middle class of an earlier epoch; 4 - Misunderstanding which led to class tensions; 5 - The old classes were to destroy themselves; 6 - The need for social capital; 7 - The hidden origins of the beautiful people; 8 - Decline of the old middle class; 9 - The first political blow; 10 - How the Tories betrayed the old middle class; 11 - New values and emergence of the middle-middle majority; 12 - Decline of the old working class; 13 - A call to the declining classes; 14 - The new egalitarianism. PART II; Introduction to Part II:-; EXORCISING THE GHOST OF MARX; CHAPTER 7; Transformation of the World of Work; 1 - Need to re-build the Labour Party; 2 - Churning over old ideas compounds issues rather than resolves them; 3 - The philosophy needs up-dating; 4 - Evidence of Party decline; 5 - Causes of poor morale; 6 - Mismatch between the world of actuality and constructive thought; 7 - Tony Blair and his values; 8 - The problem with pragmatists; 9 - How it weakens resolve; 10 - The values of Old Labour and Old Socialism; 11 - How they became anachronistic; 12 - Changes in the sociology of work; 13 - Spirit of toleration has emerged from the heterogeneous middle-middle majority; 14 - Demise of unfair discrimination; 15 - How toleration has advanced individualism; 16 - Class war is now anathema with the majority; CHAPTER 8; Intellectual Bankruptcy of the Left; 1 - Labour must look forward but never back; 2 - Transformed working class abhors class conflict; 3 - Transformation of the old middle class; 4 - Discrimination against any intrinsic groups is no longer acceptable; 5 - Social structures no longer enable a class war situation; 6 - Social Capitalism is about empowering the individual; 7 - Analysis of capitalism is at the core of Social Capitalism; 8 - Labour leaders have always disdained business; 9 - Differentiating desirable from undesirable business practices; 10 - The phony and the real economies; 11 - The dialectic of Productive Profitability in assessing all business activity; 12 - New Labour associates with the wrong business leaders; 13 - And consequently has failed to address urgent issues; 14 - Labour's new 90 per cent constituency?; 15 - The great struggle ahead; 16 - The dialectic of Social Capitalism in empowering change; 17 - Marxism remains a barrier against change; 18 - And through collectivism denies freedom; 19 - Emergence of the Responsible Society and its significance; CHAPTER 9; Practical Failures of the Left; 1 - Socially accountable capitalism is now the only acceptable form of capitalism; 2 - Contemporary Socialism fails to challenge corporate capital; 3 - And the dynamics essential to business; 4 - Technology exerts social and economic change; 5 - The moral high ground of groups does not in itself justify their right to power; 6 - Worldwide atrocities of Old Socialism; 7 - Working people no longer natural Labour supporters; 8 - The ills of Old Socialism are systemic; 9 - Right wing parties have passed more legislation benefiting the masses; 10 - Futility of hero-worship or that of bygone movements. CHAPTER 10; Why Socialism Repels; 1 - Good intentions not enough; 2 - Primal causes must be sought and understood; 3 - Socialist-like legislation from non-Socialist sources is still a benefit; 4 - Socialism emerges most successfully in highly educated societies; 5 - The problem of presenting Socialism; 6 - The surreptitious influence of Marx; 7 - The unconscious Marxists; 8 - Marxism is a science for revolution rather than a programme for construction; 9 - Psychological reasons for resisting the lure of Socialism; CHAPTER 11; The Bane of Marxism; 1 - Marxism must be repudiated; 2 - Relevance and irrelevance of Marxism today; 3 - Towards the new class consciousness; 4 - The different nature of future radical struggle; 5 - Marxism today is retrogressive; 6 - Marx failed to predict the bifurcation of capitalism into malign and benign forms; 7 - His idealisation of the proletariat falsified reality; 8 - Today's multi-class majority are repelled by his view of the proletariat; 9 - Politics as a "science"; 10 - Subjectivity of class struggle devalues politics as a science; 11 - The psychological fault lines in Marxism; 12 - Futility of the Labour Value theory; CHAPTER 12; The Core of Social Capitalist Philosophy; 1 - Social Capitalism's Productive Profitability as an objective evaluation method; 2 - A constructive methodology for the resolution of conflict; 3 - Social Capitalism employs the descriptive mode in foretelling a desirable future; 4 - As it also equally values those from every sector of society; 5 - Invalidity of dialectical-materialism; 6 - New Idealism as an essential tool for constructive thought and as a unified conceptual synthesis; 7 - The 20th century's dearth of political thought; 8 - The legacy of 20th century philosophy; 9 - Consequently, political philosophy (or science) has been placed in a straitjacket; 10 - Need to consider ethical values; 11 - Other values of idealist philosophy; 12 - Marx an accident of history; CHAPTER 13; Promoting The New Socialist Message; 1 - Fourfold approach to the core values of Social Capitalism; 2 - Ethical appeal to all sectors of society; 3 - Most highly-educated should be drawn in as activists; 4 - Promoting Social Capitalist education; 5 - Aspiring qualities of New Socialists; 6 - Spreading the message; 7 Creating the right social ambience; 8 - A role for the older generation; 9 - Spin-doctoring has discredited the Labour Party; 10 - The need for Public Intellectuals; 11 - The role of the trades union movement; 12 - Promoting Social Capitalism. PART III; Introduction to Part III:- page - 169; THE CALL ON EXPERTISE FOR CHANGE; CHAPTER 14; Acknowledging Social Change; 1 - A unanimity on social values; 2 - Privilege is now a thing from the past; 3 - Class-based parties have served their useful purpose; 4 - The multi-class (or classless) society loathes intolerance; 5 - Business values are the essential springboard for general prosperity; 6 - Industry and not the politics of the left did more to raise the standards of the poor; 7 - Old Socialists fail to acknowledge the political significance of social change; 8 - They never attempted to develop a business culture; 9 - Unreality of Old Socialism's benign view of human nature; 10 - Why Old Socialists refuse to consider the views of the broader populace; 11 - The political system has alienated itself from the people, not vice versa; 12 - Mismatch between ideology and actuality; 13 - Old Socialist doctrines an embarrassment to the Labour Party; 14 - Real class divisions prior to; 1950 15 - The spirit of tolerance has evoked an intolerance of class war; 16 - Divisiveness is judged by the majority as perverse; CHAPTER 15; Futility of Class Struggle; 1 - Education and cooperation in the work environment; 2 - Egalitarianism in the wake of consumerism; 3 - The passing of privilege makes for a democratic environment; 4 - Lack of class-based issues; 5 - Not even Rentier Capitalism lends itself to class struggle; 6 - Those operating the worst aspects of capitalism cannot easily be identified as a class; 7 - The existing remnants of class war Socialists; 8 - The benign dialectical purpose of class war was malign in practice; 9 - New Labour's fence-sitting leaves Socialism in limbo; 10 - Whilst a dualistic society makes for confrontation, a multi-class middle-middle majority makes for cooperation; 11 - A comparison between past and present; 12 - When envy is a private vice and not a reflection of social ills; CHAPTER 16; Employers in The Vanguard of Progress; 1 - Justice and equality can only be achieved through the initiative of those at the apex of society; 2 - Those amongst the apex of society have always promoted the interests of the majority; 3 - Middle class fear of the proletarianisation of society: its political basis; 4 - Its psychological basis; 5 - Attractions of Social Capitalism to the affluent; 6 - Inevitable juggernaut of freedom for the majority; 7 - Employee ownership will promote not hinder efficiency; 8 - Socialism in practice prevents the achievement of its own purpose; 9 - How employee ownership will be achieved and welcomed by bosses. 10 - Leading industrialists as Social Capitalists; 11 - Social Capitalism a return to St. Simonism; 12 - If Marxism had been bye-passed real Socialism may have already been achieved at an earlier epoch in history; CHAPTER 17; The Social Capitalism of Industrialists; 1 - The City represses those with innovative ideas; 2 - Whilst the Labour Party spurns innovative industrialists; 3 - Examples of outstanding industrialists; 4 - A classless Socialism would be very different from a proletarian Socialism; 5 - A well-informed objectivity compared with a resentful subjectivity; 6 - Promoting a changing community as opposed to one preserved in aspic; 7 - Consequences of the merging political parties; 8 - Towards a one-party system; 9 - Insincerity of Labour's attitude towards class; 10 - Goodwill and candid attitudes in creating the Responsible society; 11 - Curiosity and appreciating psychological motivations; 12 - Social ethics is the core to uniting different cultural class groups; CHAPTER 18; The Social Capitalist Network; 1 - Re-building Labour's membership; 2 - The alternative realism of class party strife; 3 - Strategy for a Social Capitalist Network; 4 - A discreet movement; 5 - Techniques to be employed; 6 - Targeting prospective Social Capitalists; 7 - And those in the local community; 8 - Door-to-door and high-street canvassing; 9 - Network Circles; 10 - Organisation of the Network; PART IV; ADDRESSING SOME CURRENT ISSUES: AN EXERCISE IN APPLYING NEW SOCIALIST PRINCIPLES; CHAPTER 19; Healing The Rural/Urban Political Divide; 1 - The traditional divide; 2 - Misconceptions about rural life; 3 - When urbanites are disabused of their illusions; 4 - Characteristics of the farmer; 5 - Unique features of the agricultural market; 6 - Inevitable conservatism of farmers; 7 - Labour's disdain for rural interests; 8 - Social Capitalism gives a high priority to farming interests; 9 - Farmers now exists in a political vacuum; 10 - Crazy market conditions; 11 - Rentier economy undermining rural life; 12 - How hunting has become a metaphor for freedom; 13 - A Labour PPC and the Hunt Protesters; 14 - Why hunting has become a political totemic cause; 15 - Social Capitalism's agricultural doctrines; 16 - Need to appreciate social difference between functional groups; 17 - Confronting the hunting issue; 18 - Interdependence of town and country; 19 - Rentier corporations are the real enemy of home-based agriculture. CHAPTER 20; The Super-Rich and Communal Need; 1 - Benign and malign aspects of great personal wealth; 2 - When the rich are wrongly blamed; 3 - Concerns of the middle-middle majority at the top 1 per cent; 4 - Inviolability of the super-rich is protected by the international economy; 5 - Emergence of the inflationary trickle-up economy; 6 - Who the super-rich are; 7 - Pricking their conscience; 8 - Their promotion of the rentier economy; 9 - The problem of taxation; 10 - Categorising the top 1 per cent; 11 - Re-establishing the Upper Exchequer courts; 12 - Adverse effect of the super-rich on the macro-economy; 13 - Comparison with Rome; 14 - Self-deception of the CBI; 15 - Counter-warnings; 16 - The exporting of skills; 17 - Why others call for protectionism; 18 - Warnings of US scholars on the winner takes all society; 19 - A culture may be transformed through financial shifts in the economic system; CHAPTER 21; Confronting The Future; 1 - Tony Blair and Social Capitalism; 2 - What politicians think more important than what they say; 3 - The smooth accession of Social Capitalism; 4 - As a middle class movement; 5 - And as the Responsible Society; 6 - Social Capitalism as a worldwide belief system; 7 - In countering the causes of terrorism; 8 - Futility of brute force; 9 - Propagating the message; 10 - Confronting Neo-Liberalism; 11 - Its economic characteristics and seeds of self-destruction; 12 - The problem of America; 13 - Her benign past and malign present; 14 - The real emerging world political divide; 15 - A role for Britain; 16 - Ruinous consequences of the "Special relationship"; 17 - Regaining her integrity and independence; APPENDIX A Egalitarianism and Meritocracy; APPENDIX B On Authoritative Texts; APPENDIX C More Than an Ordinary Party; SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX; Please note that when the male pronoun is used throughout the following text, that this refers, in accordance to the OED definition, to "a person of unspecified sex," unless otherwise indicated to the contrary, and that therefore no discrimination of any kind, in either thought or intention, in utilising the brevity of English grammar, should be construed as a reflection against the female sex.
EAN: 9780955605536
ISBN: 0955605539
Untertitel: New. Sprache: Englisch.
Verlag: ARENA BOOKS
Erscheinungsdatum: März 2008
Seitenanzahl: 324 Seiten
Format: kartoniert
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